Encyclopedia Scavenger Hunt

Encyclopedia Scavenger Hunt for Kids...Make Learning FunHi, I’m Sara, and I have a book problem. Phew. There, I said it.

Being a homeschooler, I have noticed a teensy-tiny tendency to buy hoards of books, and justify them as “for school”. Which isn’t necessarily a bad thing; we now have a bunch of really neat and fun educational books. But, it didn’t really matter because Tater wasn’t really reading them. I mean, if you’re 7 years old, why are you going to pull out huge copies of A History of the World or 1000 Animals of the Ocean when you could read Berenstain Bears? So, I was pondering how to get Tater to really delve into these encyclopedias we have, without it feeling like a chore.

A scavenger hunt!

It hit me all of a sudden…Tater loooooovvvvesss games and puzzles, so one evening after dinner, I pulled out a copy of our Ocean encyclopedia and gave her a list of things to find. Some were easy, like a fish or a dolphin. Some were subjective like “something adorable” or “a funny looking creature”. It took her about 10 minutes to finish the hunt, but then she spent a while looking through the volume and pointing out interesting facts and trivia. She read the encyclopedia until it was time to get ready for bed (that’s an impressive feat since most of her free time has been going to Minecraft lately!) She even asked me to create another hunt for the following day.

The next day I pulled out an illustrated atlas of the US, and had her find things like “a city that begins with ‘M'”, “a state bird”, and “a lake in a southern state.” Again, she asked for more. I’m going to start doing one of these a week with her, since she truly enjoys it and is learning in the process.

Tips for creating an Encyclopedia Scavenger Hunt

-Have a Variety of Difficulty
     -Kids will lose interest if it’s either too challenging or too easy. You want to vary it up a bit. You could do something really specific, followed by a super easy task.

-Make Some Subjective
-In our Natural History hunt below (which is basically a big book categorizing all living plants and animals), I made sure to have a couple of subjective tasks on there, including “an animal you would want for a pet”. Kids will read more in depth if they feel they should form an opinion about it.

-Don’t Overdo It
-As fun as these are for Tater, I need to create them for her just a little less than she wants to do them. That way, it’s a treat and a novelty instead of a commonplace activity.

-Explore New Genres
     -If you don’t have a  book problem like me, you can borrow some books at the library to do these hunts with. Use different subjects, such as Encyclopedias of History (either broad or specific time frames), Bible, World Cultures, US Geography, Zoology, Marine Biology, and Botany.

Now that I’ve found a use for all these books, I think it’s time to start looking into a bigger bookshelf!

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3 thoughts on “Encyclopedia Scavenger Hunt

  1. What a fun idea. My kids are a wee bit too young right now, but I love this idea with helping them to understand different books and where they would find information, even if they can’t read yet.

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